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Colonial Inn Historic Smithville
615 E. Moss Mill Rd., #96

The Colonial Inn is only 20 mins from Atlantic City and perfect for a relaxing retreat! Located in the Historic Towne of Smithville with over its unique shops, eateries, paddle boats and free weekend events. The village offers much to do and all within walking distance of the Colonial Inn rooms. The Colonial Inn exceeds your expectations with its attention to luxurious detail. Double soaking tubs or steam showers, lakeside views or a room with a porch are just a few amenities you can choose from. Serving up breakfast of muffins and juice in a county basket, and an endless cookie jar with tea or coffee in the afternoon. Considered a romantic getaway, we accommodate adults only. However, the Barn Country Inn has 12 rooms with two Queen beds and day beds, perfect for families. All rooms are walking distance to the stores and restaurant of Historic Smithville.
Colonial Inn Historic Smithville
Irish Pub and Inn
164 St. James Place

The Irish Pub & Inn has been raved about by almost everyone who has ever stepped in the door. Called by some major magazines, "America's Greatest Pub," it's one place you don't want to miss when in Atlantic City. Convenient to the Boardwalk, beach and casinos, The Irish Pub also features a beautiful Victorian Inn with rooms starting at $25 per night. And, for your conveniece, there is free parking next door to the pub!

We offer great lunch and dinner specials plus a large selection of beer including Harp, Bass, Killian's, Murphy's and Yuengling on draft.

If you're looking to experience a taste of the old Atlantic City, as depicted in the popular HBO series "Boardwalk Empire," look no further than The Irish Pub. In fact, at one time, it was a speakeasy, back in the days of prohibition.

The history of the Irish Pub dates back to the 19th century. It has survived hurricanes, prohibition, two world wars, high tides and low tides. It has fed the famous and infamous. Being situated on St. James Place & the Boardwalk, it has been identified with the game of Monopoly and the red hotels used in the game are based on the architecture of the Irish Pub.
Irish Pub and Inn
J.D. Thompson Inn Bed & Breakfast
149 East Main St.

Enjoy a perfect romantic getaway at our beautiful B&B where you'll find elegant accommodations in a Victorian setting near the historic Tuckerton Seaport, Long Beach Island beaches, fine dining, kayaking, boating and much more. Great location to explore the New Jersey Shore and just a short drive from Atlantic City.
J.D. Thompson Inn Bed & Breakfast
Jonathan Pitney House Bed & Breakfast
57 North Shore Rd.

The Jonathan Pitney House is a Historical retreat. This meticulously restored home built in the 1700's was home to the Father of Atlantic City. Old time bear claw tubs, gas fireplaces and hardwood floors are just some of the pampering touches you will find. Just 12 miles from Atlantic City but it feels like it is centuries apart. Full breakfast and snack are included as well as a snack cabinet. Wifi Flat screen TVs, private baths, charging stations, garden area's, porch areas and private seating areas are what you should expect when you arrive. Relax and enjoy the quiet of authentic Victorian guest rooms at The Jonathan Pitney House Bed and Breakfast. HISTORY Dr. PitneyJonathan Pitney, now known as “The Father of Atlantic City”, saw the first possibilities of Atlantic City as a premier resort destination. On October 27, 1797 Mr. Pitney was born in Mendham New Jersey where his family resided for many centuries. He grew up to study medicine at The University of Columbia, later going on to practice for two years in the Staten Island hospital. Dr. Pitney soon returned to New Jersey to practice medicine in his hometown, but his practice didn’t seem to be enough for him. Dr. Pitney had some other ideas… In May of 1820 Jonathan Pitney road horseback one hundred miles from home to the small town of Absecon ,where he became, according to local historians, “the most influential physician of the county”. Dr. Pitney extolled the restorative properties of the sea air and salt water of Absecon Island through his medical practices to the few people living in English Creek and Port Republic. He was convinced that with Absecon’s perfect climate and accessible salt water, it would make the perfect health resort. Mr. Pitney along with Samuel Richards, a glass maker of the town, had the idea of train transportation to run through Absecon. He saw Atlantic City and Absecon Island’s potential of being “ a city on the sea” but the limited transportation, beside horse and carriage, made it difficult for the city to be found and loved by many. Locals were weary of Dr. Pitney’s idea of the doctors talk and deemed his railroad to Absecon to be “the railroad to nowhere”. Unconcerned with the publics opinion, Jonathan was persistant in making Absecon a destination location. In September of 1852 a contract was awarded to Jonathon Pitney for the construction of a railroad between Delaware River and Absecon Island. Just a short two years later, July 4, 1854 the railroad to Absecon was completed and trains began to be operating fully. Just as Mr. Pitney promised, the railroad was a great success and is what stated Atlantic City to be a land boom. Thanks to Pitney’s efforts that Atlantic City’s tourism and industry could grow to eventually become the global resort destination that it is today.Pitney House Along with the building of railroad that led Atlantic City to fame, Dr. Jonathan Pitney was involved in many other aspects of the community. Around 1835 during his career as a doctor, Jonathan Pitney would often travel by horseback through the sand dunes of Absecon Island to visit his patients. This led him to witness many ship wrecks along the coast, especially at what is now known as the “Graveyard Inlet” . He started his plea to congress for a light house to be built. It was not until 1854 after the packet ship Powhatan sank off the coast of New Jersey in a storm killing about 311 people, did congress take notice to Pitney’s request. During the ship wreck some of the victims washed up to the shore of Atlantic City. Forty Five were buried in Absecon, and Fifty Four were buried at Smithville Methodist Church, a graveyard directly across from The Pitney House. After almost a decade of plea-ing, a Congressional grant of $35,000 for the construction of the Absecon Lighthouse in Atlantic City in 1857 was granted. The Absecon Lighthouse is still up and running today.
Jonathan Pitney House Bed & Breakfast
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